Somebody Once Believed Jesus Had A Wife

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This article was first published on Todd Bolen's blog at Bible Places.com

Excerpt The problem with the headline story of recent days is not the discovery of an ancient document that suggests that someone once believed that Jesus had a wife. There were many false and unbiblical teachings in ancient times, just as there are today. The problem is the media can very easily make a minor story into something sensational that appears to threaten historic Christianity... Continue reading

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The lead paragraph of the USA Today article (offsite link) says it this way:

A papyrus fragment from the fourth century contains a phrase in which Jesus refers to "My wife," which a U.S. scholar says is the first evidence supporting the belief among early Christians that he was married.

That’s the version that most will read. Contrast that with first paragraph of the academic paper (offsite link) on which the story is based (bold font mine):

Published here for the first time is a fragment of a fourth-century CE codex in Coptic containing a dialogue between Jesus and his disciples in which Jesus speaks of “my wife.” This is the only extant ancient text which explicitly portrays Jesus as referring to a wife. It does not, however, provide evidence that the historical Jesus was married, given the late date of the fragment and the probable date of original composition only in the second half of the second century. Nevertheless, if the second century date of composition is correct, the fragment does provide direct evidence that claims about Jesus’s marital status first arose over a century after the death of Jesus in the context of intra-Christian controversies over sexuality, marriage, and discipleship. Just as Clement of Alexandria (d. ca 215 C.E.) described some Christians who insisted Jesus was not married, this fragment suggests that other Christians of that period were claiming that he was married.

A few observations:

1. We have known for a very long time that some people around the year 200 argued that Jesus had a wife.

2. A newly discovered but poorly preserved fragment may suggest that some people around the year 200 argued that Jesus had a wife.

3. Ancient texts that showed that some people believed that Jesus had a wife were non-existent until the discovery of this fragment.

4. There were many “Christian” groups in the first few centuries that had bizarre beliefs that contradicted Scripture.

5. The early church was in wide agreement that Jesus did not have a wife.

6. No first-century document ever mentions or hints at the possibility that Jesus had a wife.

7. Jesus understood his identity and his atoning death from the beginning of his earthly ministry, and he knew that marriage was not part of his mission.

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ABR Editorial Note: This article was posted by permission of the author with minor edits. We will be posting more information and analysis shortly on this recent news story.

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9/20/2012 3:22 PM #

Point 1 seems to contradict Point 3. Does Mr. Bolen mean " Ancient papyri that showed that some people believed that Jesus had a wife were non-existent until the discovery of this fragment."?

Enopoletus Harding - 9/20/2012 3:22:46 PM

9/20/2012 4:21 PM #

Dear Enopoletus,

Your re-phrasing is correct. I was attempting to distinguish ancient (extant) documents, papyrus and otherwise, from the writings of church fathers, usually preserved in much later (medieval) manuscripts.



Thanks,

Todd

ABR - 9/20/2012 4:21:01 PM

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